Last Notes: And Other Stories

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His perception of human psychology was ahead of his time and in many ways remains relevant to this day.

Matt (Columbia, MO)’s review of Last Notes: And Other Stories

Overall, the stories were just None of them really sparked an interest and about two of them just had me rolling my eyes. Maybe it's just a matter of meaning being lost in translation that can't be conveyed unless its in the original language? All in all, just a bit disappointed Jan 16, Karen Lynn rated it it was amazing. This says I've finished reading this as I've finished a few of the novellas, but I have yet to finish reading it in its entirety.

When I do, I will update for sure. Mar 28, Ema rated it really liked it. It was interesting. I've been wondering if I've exiled, can I write a good book.

Short story

Jun 18, Kerri rated it really liked it. This is one of those books where I feel like a lot of it went over my head as there were breaks in my reading of it.

Plus, it's Dostoyevsky. My main thought upon finishing Notes from Underground is: how sad. How sad that the narrator is his own worst enemy. And he tries to justify it all. I need to think about it a bit more, but for now my thoughts are not very coherent on the matter. Adding on: The Meek One: Another sad story. In some ways sadder than the first because the narrator is in many wa This is one of those books where I feel like a lot of it went over my head as there were breaks in my reading of it.

In some ways sadder than the first because the narrator is in many ways good, but he just doesn't know how to show it or be it and because of that potentially, he loses all. This one was a lift from the other two. Some quotes, since I don't know where else to put them: "Here I, for instance, quite naturally want to live, in order to satisfy all my capacities for life, and not simply my capacity for reason, that is, not simply one twentieth of my capacity for life.

What does reason know? Reason only knows what it has succeeded in learning Granted that man does nothing but seek that mathematical certainty, he traverses oceans, sacrifices his life in the quest, but to succeed, really to find it, he dreads, I assure you. He feels that when he has found it there will be nothing for him to look for. When workmen have finished their work they do at least receive their pay, they go to the tavern, then they are taken to the police station - and there is occupation for a week.

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But where can man go? Anyway, one can observe a certain awkwardness about him when he has obtained such objects. He loves the process of attaining, but does not quite like to have attained, and that, of course, is very absurd. I had a foreboding that that stain would deprive me of nine-tenths of my personal dignity. If once one has recognized the truth and seen it, you know that it is the truth and that there is no other and there cannot be, whether you are asleep or awake. Oct 06, Sonia rated it really liked it Shelves: have. Dostoevsky's collection was a rather difficult read for me.

I wanted to do it justice by really thinking about what I was reading. It took me longer to get through it than is normal, but I still think it was a worthy read. I've heard that Dostoevsky was a genius and I definitely think that comes through in his writing. In spite of the cultural and period differences, there is still a relevant cross-current through each of his works. Philosophically, I think Dostoevsky understood a lot about human Dostoevsky's collection was a rather difficult read for me.

Philosophically, I think Dostoevsky understood a lot about human nature, but I suspect that he based a lot of his character's thoughts on his own hopefully exaggerated viewpoints. His characters with the exception of the ridiculous man, are pretty despicable examples of the human race: self-absorbed narcisstic men who might actually be doing the world a favor by maintaining their isolated existences apart from society.

Yet it was a fascinating insight into the mind of intelligent and analytical men and I think it may hold true for a lot of individuals even in today's world. Aug 27, Beth rated it did not like it. Dostoyevsky is a great writer who paints a scene and an emotion so precise that there is no question what he is trying to say in the writing.

My problem was his existentialism. There were 5 short stories of his in this collection.

A Young Doctor's Notebook & Other Stories Trailer

One after the other he poured his tortured soul and mistrust of society out on to the page. It actually began to mess with me psychologically at one point and I had to put the book down for a few days. I think that I would have been better able to take his "heavy" stor Dostoyevsky is a great writer who paints a scene and an emotion so precise that there is no question what he is trying to say in the writing. I think that I would have been better able to take his "heavy" stories if there were sprinkles amongst other authors, but not other existentialists i. Besides the content of the stories, Dostoyevsky is able to create tortured characters who feel so real that we can identify with some of there misgivings and shortcomings in life.

This is my first experience with Dostoyevsky and I will give him another chance, only because he is an excellent creator of characters and scene. Sep 12, C Joy rated it liked it Shelves: public-reads , classic-lit. Frankly I don't know where to start.

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The text was overwhelming and mostly dragging, but there were some stories that were interesting. This collection of stories are mostly on the philosophical, monologues of unconventional heroes who shy away from society. I read for entertainment and I picked this up so I could read one of Dostoevsky's works, because I liked his "Crime and Punishment".

I'm not exactly an intellectual, and this one felt like a reading material for school. I'm just a reader who wa Frankly I don't know where to start. I'm just a reader who wanted to read a classic, but sometimes I had to rest from it because of the endless character monologues and thoughts. I understand Dostoevsky's style is delving into the human minds, and this one has little entertainment value. Nov 13, Kevin rated it really liked it. I read Notes from Underground in an electronic edition on my iPhone. It's the first book I've read on my phone all the way through.

By the end I really liked the observations the narrator was making but it took a while to grow on me.


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The whole book is a rant by a depressed narrator about his in-the-moment crud, stuck in the contemplation stage of half a dozen pay-back schemes that he can't bring himself to act out. But it grew on me, I have to say. For phone readers I recommend the iBooks app. T I read Notes from Underground in an electronic edition on my iPhone. The page turning effect meant a lot.

Every time I lost my place and re-read large sections again before I realized what had happened it was so much nicer seeing the simulated pages turning over on the phone screen. I understand now why Bukowski said that he was a student of Dostoyevsky. But Bukowski has a sense of humor that I don't see in Dostoyevsky. Recommended though.

The Young Salinger, Mordant Yet Hopeful

Jul 11, Hosanna rated it really liked it Shelves: read-again , Dostoevsky strikes again. From the gradual mental degeneration of Golyadkin in "The Double" at parts reminiscent of Jekyll and Hyde and Kafka's "Metamorphosis" , the ultimate heartbreak of the "White Nights" dreamer, the Underground Man's masochistic commitment to self-humiliation, to the dawn of the degenerate utopia in "The Dream of a Ridiculous Man," the characters in the novels all male succeed in exacerbating their shame, misery and isolation, not so much because of external events, but Dostoevsky strikes again.

From the gradual mental degeneration of Golyadkin in "The Double" at parts reminiscent of Jekyll and Hyde and Kafka's "Metamorphosis" , the ultimate heartbreak of the "White Nights" dreamer, the Underground Man's masochistic commitment to self-humiliation, to the dawn of the degenerate utopia in "The Dream of a Ridiculous Man," the characters in the novels all male succeed in exacerbating their shame, misery and isolation, not so much because of external events, but due to their own internal resolve. Perhaps, that is what makes the novels so morbidly intriguing. The dialogue that occurs in Part II of "Notes from Underground" may well be one of the most chilling passages I have ever read.

Aug 27, Lloyd rated it liked it Shelves: s , scorpio-writer.

Though this, the so-called "first piece of existentialist literature" was not the easiest read I've ever had, there definitely are some things in this text that I'll take away with me. Most of the folks who I've heard talk about this book and Dostoevsky in general refer to him not so much as a novelist but a psychologist that happened to be a novelist. I think I'd agree afer reading this work. Dostoevsky so broke down the "Underground Man" that sometimes I thought that these were some thoughts th Though this, the so-called "first piece of existentialist literature" was not the easiest read I've ever had, there definitely are some things in this text that I'll take away with me.

Dostoevsky so broke down the "Underground Man" that sometimes I thought that these were some thoughts that I've had at different points in my life being piped back at me This is a great dissection of a character as well as an exploration of the human condition that's worth the read Jul 31, Nicole added it. What I want to know is how I can possibly be the only person to give this 1 star.

Perhaps it is because I only read Notes From the Underground and perhaps it is also because I read it the day before school started as summer reading though, to be fair, even after days of discussing it, I still did not like it or understand it and perhaps it is even because I frankly don't understand it or much of the Russian literature I've read for that matter. So I guess I'm not one to judge. Aug 06, Lorna MacMenamin rated it really liked it.

Told through first person narrative, this book unearths in my opinion one of the most unlikeable characters I've ever come across - a complete anti-hero. He opens the book attacking the enlightenment and rationalism and rants the whole way through about the flaws of modern society.

I had this on my university book list for existentialism and only read it a few weeks ago! Really should have flicked through it at the time! Oct 23, LynthePen rated it it was amazing. Dec 23, William Eck rated it liked it Shelves: bookaweekchallenge.

Notes from Underground, The Double and Other Stories (B&N Classics)

An uneven collection. I'm not sure how good the translation is. Some of the stories, like "Dream of a Ridiculous Man," are quite moving, while others, like "The Double," are almost unreadable. I would recommend this book for "Dream of a Ridiculous Man" alone, but there may be better translations out there.